South Side Neighbors for Hope (SSN4H)

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The Trees of Jackson Park

There has been intense discussion and much reporting on the trees of Jackson Park, specifically the impact the OPC will have on this vital component of our parks.  We present here the numbers taken directly from reports or sourced data. Click on the visuals for more information and links to sources.

In January, 2018, on behalf of the Obama Foundation, the Bartlett Tree Experts performed a Tree Inventory and Management Study on a small portion of Jackson Park slightly larger than the proposed OPC site. You can find the report and plan here. From the summary:

"We identified 640 trees which included 42 species. The attributes that we collected include tree latitude and longitude, size, age and condition class, and a visual assessment of tree structure, health, and vigor."

 ~30% of the trees evaluated were found to be in less than "good" shape. See the breakdown and definitions here.

There are ~410 trees on the proposed OPC site (including the women's garden)

To make room for the new track and field on the western strip of Jackson Park, the Park District removed 23 trees (see removal plan here).  The remaining ~145 trees were left intact.  23 healthy young trees will be replanted (see replanting plan here). Read the Letter to the Editor from Heather Gleason, Director of planning and construction, Chicago Park District, describing the process of approvals for this new addition to Jackson Park, to be used by the surrounding communities for year-round exercise as well as athletic programs for Hyde Park Academy and the South Side YMCA.

~165

trees are located on the site of the new track and field

23

were removed to make way for the new track

The New Track and Field 

CDOT proposed infrastructure changes and the effect on trees

The proposed infrastructure improvements to Jackson Park (see our discussion of Cornell Drive Closing here) will require removal of many trees along Lake Shore Drive and Stony Island.  See the draft proposal here, noting that this is for discussion and is not a final plan.  The condition and age of these trees noted in the proposal have not been assessed, although some trees such as the one here, are clearly dying or dead. We will advocate for the replacement of all trees removed during this process.